UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS
SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP
UCL

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Space Plasma Research at MSSL

The Space Plasma Group at MSSL is a leading research group studying the physical interaction between the Earth and the Sun and the fundamental physics of space plasmas. The group has a history of producing instrumentation for, and analysing data from, international space exploration missions in collaboration with scientists around the world.

Scientifically, the group aims to explore how solar events and the solar wind interact with Earth's magnetosphere (the Sun-Earth connection), to determine how magnetospheric dynamics are controlled by different internal and external conditions and to identify and understand the fundamental plasma physical processes operating in these environments. In attempting to understand these fundamental physical processes at Earth, we further our understanding of how these processes affect other interacting plasma systems, such as the magnetospheres of the outer planets.

Our space hardware speciality is to measure and characterise electron and ion populations in space plasmas. Space hardware from the group has been flown on over 15 spacecraft, including two currently active missions. The datasets from these missions are available for collaborative research projects. We welcome and invite any enquiries, and will attempt to support any requests as best we can.

Our program also supports research-based studies leading to the qualification of Ph.D. from the University of London. See Ph.D. opportunities.

For the latest news and research output from the Space Plasma Group, please consult the "News" and "Publications" tickers to the right

 

This page was last modified 6 February, 2009 by cfo[at]mssl.ucl.ac.uk, cjo[at]mssl.ucl.ac.uk


Mullard Space Science Laboratory - Holmbury St. Mary - Dorking - Surrey - RH5 6NT - Telephone: +44 (0)1483 204100 - Copyright © 1999-2009 UCL


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